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Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
for word of every doe midwest incommunication in this country. >> the idea that n.s.a. is keeping files on americans as a general rule just isn't true. >> woodruff: then, rebels fired scores of rockets on the syrian city of homs as the assad regime celebrated army day. margaret warner gets the latest on the bloody civil war from npr's deborah amos. >> brown: law enforcement bids farewell to f.b.i. director robert mueller. ray suarez explores the transformation of the bureau after the 9-11 attacks. >> woodruff: and we hear from two u.s. senators leading the push to keep the military's sexual assault cases in the chain of command. gwen ifill talks to new hampshire republican kelly ayotte and missouri democrat claire mccaskill. >> the other side has wanted to make this argument about victims vs. uniforms. that's a false premise. this argument is about how we can protect victims the best. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by th
-- >> a promise from the nsa -- germany's top intelligence minister says the u.s. has offered adeal great >> could israel a someone's doom peace talks before they begin? >> and the row between britain and spain over gibraltar is heating up. london is sending out warships area -- warships. >> aagreement between the u.s. and germany -- it could be the latest result of edward snowden's revelations about mass surveillance by the nsa. >> today, the man who oversees intelligence in angela merkel's government says washington offered this deal to try to allay german peoples fears that their text and phone calls are being spied spied on by foreign agency. he appeared for the second time in front of a lawmakers committee. >> it has been dominating the headlines just six weeks before national elections in germany. now the government is hoping this new pledge will neutralize the issue. >> the government's chief of staff was grilled for six hours on the nation -- on the nature of german collaborators with foreign intelligence agencies. he has been assured that neither the u.s. or britain rope protection laws.
: the release comes amid reports of a new n.s.a. spying program on internet activity. we look at the latest revelations and the secret court at the center of the controversy. >> ifill: then, ben bernanke's tenure as federal reserve chairman nears its end, as the debate over who will replace him begins. we examine how that choice could affect the economic recovery. >> brown: egypt's government ordered police to take all means necessary to disband protests in support of the ousted president. margaret warner explores the potential for violence and the actions of the new military rule. >> ifill: and in india, child labor is outlawed, but a staggering number of children still toil away. fred de sam lazaro reports on efforts to change that practice. >> the combination of official and middle-class indifference, and dire poverty, drives perhaps 50 million children into the workplace. some as young as six or seven. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committe
whether dependency on the nsa has become too great. >> italy's supreme court upheld a ruling for berlusconi. it could 3 the government into crisis. judges upheld a jail sentence and that's automatically reduced to a year to the law aimed at reducing overcrowding in prison. they recrewed the second part of the sentence, a foof-year ban from public office. >> that are i argued that berlusconi used offshore companies to buy the rights for u.s. movies. they said he lied when declaring how much he paid and avoided about $9 million in taxes. he said in a video message that the fraud he had been convicted of is cleompletely unfounded. he has the second largest party in the ruling government and the ruling could destabilize a shaky coalition. >> the leaders ofity low's baghdad government warned protesters to end their sit-ins. members of morsi's power base in the muslim brotherhood are not backing down and call on reports after friday's prayers and two squares in the capital. they are placing sandbags on roads to the squares to block security forces. some say they will not leave even
would do irreparable harm to the n.s.a.'s ability to collect information, that terrorists were changing their communication patterns. maybe this information in the last few days maybe indicates they haven't changed so much and the n.s.a. isn't as damaged or harmed as some may have thought. >> ifill: sounds like a story that is just beginning to unfold. thank you both so much. >> thank you. >> suarez: now, the sale of a legendary newspaper to an internet legend. the "washington post" company sold its flagship paper to jeff bezos, founder of amazon, for $250 million. one family, the grahams, owned the "post" for four generations. the paper faced financial difficulties. revenues declined for seven consecutive years, including losses of $49 million in the first quarter of this year. for more on the surprising sale, we turn to tom rosenstiel, the executive director of the american press institute, a think tank for journalism. rosenstiel was a veteran newspaper reporter before becoming the founder and director of the pew project for excellence in journalism for many years. tom, if you live so
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)